A storm is brewing among video game stores. Here's what it means.

TwitterFacebook

Early in December, Fortnite developer Epic Games launched an online video game store. On Friday, voice and text chat app Discord revealed it will launch its own online store in 2019.

Both companies are undoubtedly aiming to take on Steam, and the way that they’re doing that could mean great things for everybody. Well, everybody except Steam.

Steam, developer by Valve Corporation, has been the dominant digital marketplace for video games for over a decade, and since it first began offering third-party developers to sell games on its platform in 2005, it has basically had no competition. Thus, Steam has been able to operate on the precedent that it takes 30% of revenue of all sales, because they are publishing the games after all, only recently announcing they’d drop their share down a bit if games make tens of millions of dollars (which is not super common outside of the biggest games of the year). Read more…

More about Steam, Epic Games, Discord, Entertainment, and Gaming
Source: mashable
A storm is brewing among video game stores. Here's what it means.